Category Archives: Shiraz/Syrah

Syrah? Shiraz?

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Syrah and Shiraz: two grape names recognised by most wine lovers, but it’s surprising how many don’t know that they’re actually the same variety.  Native to France’s Northern Rhône region, the grape there is always known as Syrah while, in Australia, where it was among the first vines introduced by James Busby soon after the initial European settlers, it’s generally called Shiraz. 

The reason for the 2 names is unclear although a very early spelling of the grape seems to have been ‘Scyras’ which the French might pronounce ‘Syrah’ whereas Australians might be more likely to say Shiraz.  Believe that or not as you like, but the 2 names are probably here to stay. 

And, while, in the past, most New World growers tended to use the name Shiraz for all their wines, more recently, there has been a split: those aiming for a powerful, fruity, high alcohol wine continuing to use Shiraz, while producers looking for a more spicy, lean ‘European’ style adopting the French version of the name.  I wouldn’t rely on that division entirely but I’ve certainly tasted some bottles labelled Syrah recently that tend to support the theory. 

One is Lammershoek’s ‘The Innocent’ Syrah from Swartland in South Africa (Waitrose, £9.99) – love the picture of the sheep on the label! 

Innocent SyrahThis is beautifully soft and restrained with flavours of cooked blackberries and a definite savoury edge to it.  The grapes were selected from unirrigated bush vines up to 50 years old, blending from 3 separate vineyard sites to give complexity.  Following fermentation, part of the wine was aged in large old wooden barrels, again to broaden the palate of flavours, yet always with restraint and subtlety being to the fore.  

Perhaps, not a wine for lovers of the big, chunky Shiraz style, but, for those who enjoy, say, a Crozes Hermitage or a St Joseph, there’s much to like here – and at a very reasonable price.

 

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Wine with Lobster and Beef

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“Drink with lobster risotto or rare prime rib”.  Winemakers often put advice on their labels concerning possible food matches but, I must say, this one really surprised me.  Why?  Because, in my mind, I can’t imagine a single wine that might pair successfully with these 2 dishes; indeed, in many ways, I’d be looking at almost diametrically opposite wines. 

The richness of the lobster and the creaminess of a good risotto would point me towards a big rich white – something from Burgundy or the Rhône, perhaps, or a full-bodied Californian or Australian Chardonnay. And, although I’m not someone who subscribes blindly to the ‘white with fish, red with meat’ theory, for me, a rare prime rib is definitely red wine territory with a wide range to choose from.

So, what was this miracle wine that the winemaker thought might pair with either dish? 

Cline SyrahCline Cool Climate Syrah from California’s Sonoma Coast region (Majestic, £13).  Delightfully full and rich with intense red fruit flavours and just a hint of the kind of spicy, peppery flavours that many good Rhône Syrahs display, this is undoubtedly a big wine (14% alcohol), yet everything is so beautifully in balance that you’d never feel overwhelmed – or think that you’d have to stop after a single glass.

We drank it with some orange and molasses sugar marinated venison steaks and it went really well – the fruitiness in the wine matching the sweetness in the marinade and the pepperiness going with the gamey flavours of the meat.

But, personally, I still can’t see the wine going with either lobster or risotto.  But that is the wonder of food and wine pairing – everyone’s sense of taste is unique to them and different from everyone else.  And so it should be; without that, we’d lose the very diversity of food and wines that make this such a fascinating subject.