Bristol in the News!

Greta(picture thanks to Getty Images)

It’s not often that Bristol is mentioned in the national news – even rarer that it’s the top story. But that was what happened recently when teenage climate campaigner Greta Thunberg visited the city to address an audience estimated to be around 20000 people followed by a march around the centre of town.

Her message that we need to look after our planet for the benefit of future generations is compelling but what can wine lovers and those in the wine industry do to support those aims? For the answer, we need to look at the role of the harmful gas, carbon dioxide (CO2) in the production and distribution process.

At the very beginning, there’s a positive effect. Vines, like all woody plants, absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and use it in the photosynthesis process which drives the plant’s growth. Sadly, it’s mainly downhill from then on, particularly once the grapes are harvested and arrive in the winery.

There, fermentation converts the sugar in the ripe grapes into alcohol, but this chemical reaction produces CO2 as a by-product. Fine if you’re making sparkling wine – the CO2 is captured in the bottles to make the fizz; not so good if you want still wine as then the CO2 is simply released into the atmosphere. Anyone who has been in a winery while the winemaking is ongoing will, hopefully, have been warned of this as high levels of CO2 in a confined space can be fatal.

And the negatives don’t stop there: I’ve blogged before about my hatred of over-heavy wine bottles, but there’s no doubt that they need more power to move them to the customer – and what results? More CO2!

So, what can we do (apart from stopping drinking wine, of course, which isn’t really an option for me!)? Encourage producers to use lighter bottles or other packaging materials, perhaps, or even dispense with the insistence that Quality wines have to be bottled at source; shipping to the UK in bulk and bottling here has less impact. Or, most pleasurably of all, drink more of your local sparkling wine.

 

 

 

Happy New Decade?

2016-10-19 15.50.39Let me begin by wishing you all a very Happy and Peaceful New Year. But, it’s not just a new year – it’s the start of a new decade; time, perhaps, to ponder on where the wine world will be at the end of the 2020s.

I’ve got no special talent as a forecaster – I’ve been mistakenly predicting the widespread availability of wines from China for several years! – so my thoughts are based on a continuation of what has happened in recent years. And that, inevitably means climate change.

Global warming – in some cases combined with increasing drought – has resulted in the dreadful wildfires in Australia and California that I’ve blogged about recently. But it has also meant that some areas that were previously too cool to ripen grapes reliably are now thriving – the picture above was taken at Three Choirs Vineyard in Gloucestershire, England. Even Champagne producers are buying land in southern England as an insurance against their home region becoming too warm for sparkling wine production. And, more widely, many growers are reporting that they are harvesting ripe grapes weeks earlier than their predecessors – mixed news for wine lovers as grapes that have ripened too quickly have had less time to gather nutrients from the soil and pick up flavour.

Linked to this has been another important trend this century: the increasing number of growers switching to organic – or at least more sustainable – growing methods. Viticulture has had a poor reputation for overuse of pesticides and other harmful chemicals and any reduction of these can only be good for the environment. And, on the same lines, it would be good if certain producers stopped using such ridiculously heavy wine bottles – I recently found one that weighed over 800gms empty!

But, perhaps most worrying for the wine industry in the 2020s is the fact that statistics show fewer young people are choosing to drink wine, preferring beer, spirits or even no alcohol at all. If demand falls, then less wine will be produced and that means less choice for all of us wine lovers.