Labels can Deceive

Bonfire Hill

Wine labels can sometimes tell you a lot about what is in the bottle: where the wine comes from, what grapes are involved and, perhaps, even whether the wine has been fermented in barrel or tank. And, of course, they are a useful marketing tool. Which of us has not picked up a bottle with an interesting label and then gone on to buy it?

But marketing can also go wrong. I saw the label above in Grape and Grind, one of our excellent local wine merchants and my first thought was ‘No!’ Bold, ‘in your face’ and gimmicky is just not my scene – and that was what this label said to me. And I was just about to move on when I saw the words in much smaller type: ‘a wine by Bruce Jack’.

Bruce is a South African who has been involved in a number of interesting projects, both in his home country – Flagstone and Fish Hoek spring to mind – and elsewhere: his collaboration with Ed Adams to produce the ‘La Bascula’ range in Spain is a favourite of mine.

So, I sank my prejudices against the label and bought a bottle of Bonfire Hill (£11.50). As I might expect from Bruce Jack, the wine was an unusual blend of grape varieties – Shiraz and Grenache native to the Rhône, Malbec with its origins in Bordeaux and south-west France (although these days more likely associated with Argentina) and Portugal’s Touriga Nacional – and from different vineyards across South Africa: the Swartland, Overberg and Paarl regions are all mentioned on the label.

And the taste? Not at all what I expected from my first look at the label; attractive stewed and dried fruits with hints of coffee. Quite a chunky mouthful with, at the moment, plenty of tannin but very drinkable after an hour or so in a decanter and pairing with a robust dish.

So, next time you see a label you absolutely hate, do check a little further as it might just conceal something attractive.

 

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