A Weighty Problem

Standard

We may have just welcomed in a New Year but some things haven’t changed, so, for this Bristol Wine Blog, I’m returning to an old grievance of mine.

Some time ago, a friend mentioned that she’d noticed a number of wines in really heavy bottles and asked me whether I thought that was any guide to quality.  Intrigued by the suggestion, I carried out some (not particularly scientific) research.  The result?  It was clear that some more expensive wines did come in a heavier bottle (although cost doesn’t always reflect quality nor whether the wine is to your personal taste, of course).  But it wasn’t a reliable guide; although most very cheap wines use lighter bottles, which, no doubt, cost less to produce, I also found some high end producers doing the same in a laudable effort to be environmentally aware.

Sine then, apart from muttering about the waste of the earth’s resources when I found a particularly heavy bottle, I thought little more about the subject until I picked a wine out of our rack recently and almost dropped it due to the weight.  Now, I expect sparkling wines to be in heavy bottles – they need to be made from thicker glass to contain the pressure of the bubbles – but this was a still wine and it had no such excuse.  Once empty (one of the benefits of this sort of experiment!), I checked and found the bottle weighed in at a massive 971 grams – that’s just over 2lbs 2oz. 

Although I wouldn’t normally do so, this time, I feel I must ‘name and shame’. 

heavy bottleThe wine was Avancia’s Godello from Galicia in north-west Spain; very enjoyable but I won’t be buying it again until they rethink their policy and ditch their ridiculous and wasteful bottle. 

Incidentally, does anyone know where I can get some of those ‘heavy, take care’ warning stickers that you sometimes see on cases in airports?  I think I ought to use one to alert the people who collect our bottles for recycling!

Advertisements

About Bristol Wine Blog

Bristol Wine Blog is written by Ian Abrahams, a freelance Wine Educator, trading as Wine Talks and Tastings. Ian holds the Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) Diploma, a high level professional qualification, and is a certified tutor for WSET. He runs courses for both professional and amateur wine lovers in and around Bristol including at Stoke Lodge (see the Bristol Adult Learning Service brochure or online at www.bristolcourses.com). You don’t have to be an expert or wine buff to enjoy Ian's courses, so long as you enjoy a glass of wine. Find him also on Facebook.com/winetalksandtastings.

One response »

  1. Hi Ian,

    Thanks for that but I usually find Australian Red wine bottles routinely more heavy than French/Spanish and S.African to a lesser extent. Used to think it might have been consideration against breakages given distance travelled & handling etc. Probably nieve thinking on my part.

    Best wishes and Happy New Year.

    Brian

    > On 08 January 2018 at 08:35 Wine talks and tastings > wrote: > > Bristol Wine Blog posted: “We may have just welcomed in a New Year but > some things haven’t changed, so, for this Bristol Wine Blog, I’m returning to > an old grievance of mine. Some time ago, a friend mentioned that she’d noticed > a number of wines in really heavy bottles and asked m” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s